African Muslims and International Affairs: The Hidden Part of my debate with Tariq Ramadan

1 septembre 2014

 

 By Dr. Bakary SAMBE

To understand this debate properly, we must return to the roots of my differences with Tariq Ramadan. Everything stems from my critique of his position on what he called ‘French imperialism’ in Mali. I was simply suggesting that to this critique of foreign intervention in Africa, one might add the dimension of ‘Arab paternalism’. It is a fact that Arab countries and organisations tend to consider African Muslims as the ‘weak links’ of the Ummah that need to be islamised, despite an Islamic history dating back to the Middle Ages. Sometimes this creates problems because in aiming to ‘islamise’ Africans they use salafist and Wahabi movements claiming to purify Islam, as was the case in the destruction of the tombs in Timbuctu during the jihadi occupation of the north of Mali. Here is the link to this previous debate: : http://www.lescahiersdelislam.fr/Occupation-du-Nord-Mali-L-autre-vrai-paternalisme-occulte-par-Tariq-Ramadan_a208.html

 

I had to explain myself on this point during the World Social Forum in Tunisia (March, 2013) where I called on M Ramadan, who is listened to in the Islamic world, to do his duty and change this image of the African as a second-class Muslim. I think that he never accepted this critique and particularly the challenge to his position on Islam, especially coming from an African, still regarded as a lesser Muslim in rank and dignity.

 

Instead of taking this critique from an African colleague who wishes him no harm, M Ramadan came to Senegal and said on public television that I was criticising him simply to become famous. Here is the link to this debate: http://senegal.afrix.net/2013/07/11/mise-au-point-de-bakary-sambe-cher-monsieur-ramadan-la-diffamation-est-aussi-contraire-a-lislam-et-a-lethique/

 

 

The debate on the Israel-Palestine crisis:

 

On the televised debate, I had a difficult task, having advocated dialogue despite the scale of the violence. Dialogue is not for me the privilege of the fearful or the lazy, but the duty of the courageous. From this perspective, I have insisted since the beginning of the crisis that it is important to strengthen the bloc of peace found in Fatah and its supporters. From the beginning of the crisis, in all Senegalese media, I criticised first of all the unacceptable attitude of Israel, which kills, massacres and violates international law while the international community merely watches, thereby losing more and more credibility, showing itself to use two different measures for values like justice and democracy that it wants to spread throughout the world.

 

I have criticised, even on television, the attitude of extremists on both sides, starting with those on the right of Likud like Netanyahu, Libermann and Tzipi Livni who don’t support peace and have personified the war-mongering that has plunged the Near East into its current chaos. They have killed peace and dialogue!

But I have also criticized Khaled Meshaal and the Hamas bosses who don’t help and even discredit the Palestinian cause by using violence and by rejecting dialogue when our Palestinian brothers have more need of peace than of war.

I have also said that certain Arab countries have done much harm to the Palestinians, instrumentalising the Palestinian cause rather than helping it. I think it is my criticism of ideologies like salafism and the attempts on the part of Arab countries and organisations to export them to Africa that has given offence. Islam as traditionally lived in Africa has up till now preserved a social harmony that is now widely threatened by jihadist ideologies as we have seen in the north of Mali and Nigeria.

 

But again, instead of sticking to the topic of the debate, M Ramadan wanted to settle earlier polemics such as my criticism of his position on Mali. Even before the beginning of the televised debate, he challenged me: ‘It’s you who write these articles against me?’ He set out to settle accounts with this African who dared bring into question his position on Islam and interpretation of religious texts! This was an affront he couldn’t stomach. But I have nothing against him and never join attacks sometimes unjustly made on him.

 

What shocks me today is that he has used my views on the politics of Arab countries and organisations (religious paternalism) to paint me as anti-Arab, and his supporters even consider me pro-Israeli when I have strongly condemned the massacres perpetrated against the Palestinians right from the beginning

 

I know, I was aware! It was hard to keep to the language of reason at such a time of heightened emotion. I in no way regret having called for peace with the advocates of peace, and for having criticised the extremists who don’t advance peace, whether they are Israelis or Palestinians. I have never sanctioned the policy of massacre and murder of the Israeli government, but I also had the courage to tell our Arab friends that the solution lies in dialogue and that war-mongering plays into the hands of the ultra-radicals of Likud and Hamas.  However, I can tell the difference between David and Goliath!

 

To reassure colleagues and friends who worry about the demonising Tariq Ramadan has tried to do to me, my position (that I had difficulty defending because of the time constraints which didn’t permit adequate explanation), can be summed up in three points:

 

  1. Strong condemnation of Israeli atrocities – see my position from the beginning, as the first Senegalese intellectual to speak of the unacceptable attitude of Israel to violation of international law and of international humanitarian law See link : http://www.dakaractu.com/Entretien-Gaza-L-usage-disproportionne-de-la-force-par-Israel-en-flagrante-violation-du-droit-international-est-source_a70409.html

 

  1. I am on the side of dialogue, and thus favour the peace bloc of Fatah and Mahmoud Abbas. If the extremists of Likud and Hamas control developments, there will never be peace (that’s why, incidentally, I reject the comparison of Nelson Mandela with Hamas).
  2. I have emphasised the solidarity of Arabs and Africans, but I reject every form of paternalism and ideological exportation which denies to Africans the possibility of living Islam according to their realities, as I emphasised in March 2013 during another debate with Ramadan in Tunis. See link : Tunis http://en.qantara.de/content/interview-with-bakary-sambe-in-the-arab-world-we-africans-are-viewed-as-inferior-muslims

 

Everything has arisen from my critique of the Muslim Brotherhood when I explained that it was certainly a political party but no ‘ordinary’ one, since it had as emblem two crossed swords over the words ‘Prepare Yourselves’.

See link : http://www.dakaractu.com/Dr-Bakary-SAMBE-UGB-a-Tariq-Ramadan-Comparer-Nelson-Mandela-au-Hamas-est-une-insulte-a-sa-memoire_a72017.html

 

 

After that Tariq Ramadan labelled me a ‘colonised mind’ in arguing that I took my position from Paris or Washington. I never understood this attitude, which hardly damaged me, especially coming from one who, having loyally served as advisor to Tony Blair, then delivered himself into the arms of Shaykha Muza and Qatar! Really!

 

At the end of the debate, inspired especially by Cheikh Ahmadou Bamba, Cheikh El Hadji Malick and Cheikh Moussa Camara in my critique of jihadism and violence in the name of Islam, I reaffirmed that in Africa we have the appropriate resources for Islamic religious discourse and have no need to be Muslims supervised by others.

 

I even believe that our Arab friends might be invited to be inspired by the successes of the African experience of Islam, notably the harmony between social reality and religious principles that I call ‘the critical assimilation of Islam’, and our peaceful coexistence – while of course acknowledging the inadequacies on both sides.

 

Dr. Bakary Sambe

Head of Observatory on Religious Radicalism and Conflicts in Africa

Center for the Study of Religions

Gaston Berger University

www.cer-ugb.net

bakarysambe.unblog.fr

bakary.sambe@gmail.com

 

Africains Musulmans et questions internationales : La partie invisible du débat avec Tariq Ramadan

1 septembre 2014

Par Dr. Bakary SAMBE 

Pour mieux comprendre ce débat, il faut vraiment retourner à l’origine des divergences avec Tariq Ramadan. Tout est parti de ma critique sur sa prise de position sur ce qu’il appelle  » l’impérialisme français » dans l’intervention au Mali. Je lui suggérais simplement d’ajouter à cette critique de l’intervention des forces étrangères en Afrique, la dimension du « paternalisme arabe ». En fait les pays et organisations arabes ont tendance à considérer les musulmans africains comme des maillons faibles de la oummah qu’il faut islamiser malgré le passé « islamique » depuis le Moyen-Age.

Parfois, cela cause de nombreux problèmes parce qu’en voulant « islamiser » les Africains ils s’appuient sur des mouvements salafistes et wahhabites qui disent vouloir purifier l’islam comme ce fut le cas avec la destruction des mausolées de Tombouctou lors de l’occupation djihadiste dans le Nord du Mali. Voici le lien de ce débat antérieur : http://www.lescahiersdelislam.fr/Occupation-du-Nord-Mali-L-autre-vrai-paternalisme-occulte-par-Tariq-Ramadan_a208.html

J’ai eu à m’expliquer sur cette question avec Monsieur Ramadan lors du Forum Social Mondial en Tunisie où je l’appelais à assumer ses responsabilités car sa parole était écoutée dans le monde musulman pour que cette image de l’africain toujours considéré comme sous-musulman dans le monde arabe change enfin.

Je pense qu’il n’a jamais supporté cette critique et surtout la contestation de sa parole sur l’islam venant, en plus, d’un africain (toujours un musulman inférieur en rang et en dignité). Au lieu de prendre cette critique avec humilité de la part d’un collègue africain qui ne lui veut aucun mal, Monsieur Ramadan est venu au Sénégal pour dire sur la chaîne de télévision publique sénégalaise que je le critiquais simplement pour devenir célèbre. Voir le lien de ce débat : http://senegal.afrix.net/2013/07/11/mise-au-point-de-bakary-sambe-cher-monsieur-ramadan-la-diffamation-est-aussi-contraire-a-lislam-et-a-lethique/

Sur le débat à propos de la crise israélo-palestinienne :

Sur le débat télévisé, j’avais une posture difficile en ayant prôné le dialogue malgré l’ampleur de la violence. Ma position sur le dialogue est motivée par le fait que le dialogue ne soit pas pour moi l’apanage des peureux ou des lâches mais une responsabilité des braves.

Dans cette perspective, j’ai soutenu depuis le début de la crise qu’il serait important de renforcer le camp de la paix incarné par le Fatah et ses soutiens. Dès le début de la crise dans tous les médias sénégalais j’ai critiqué tout d’abord l’attitude inacceptable d’Israel qui tue, massacre et viole le droit international sous le regard spectateur de la communauté internationale perdant de plus en plus de crédibilité et faisant du « deux poids deux mesures » sur les valeurs qu’elle veut incarner comme la justice et la démocratie à travers le monde.

J’ai critiqué y compris sur le plateau de télévision, l’attitude des extrémistes des deux bords en commençant par ceux de la droite du Likoud comme Netanyahu, Libermann, Tzipi Livni qui n’encouragent pas la paix et ont incarné un bellicisme qui a plongé le Proche-Orient dans le chaos actuel. Ils ont assassiné la paix et l’esprit du dialogue. Mais j’ai aussi critiqué Khaled Meshaal et les caciques du Hamas qui n’aident pas toujours la cause palestinienne et y jettent un certain discrédit en usant de la violence et en repoussant le dialogue alors que je suis sûr que nos frères palestiniens ont besoin de plus de paix que de guerre ! J’ai dit aussi que certains pays arabes ont surtout instrumentalisé la question palestinienne et ont causé beaucoup de tort aux palestiniens en se servant de leur cause juste plus qu’ils ne la servent !

C’est surtout ma critique des idéologies telles que le salafisme et les tentatives d’exportation en Afrique par des pays et organisations arabes qui dérange, je crois.

L’islam tel que vécu traditionnellement en Afrique avait jusqu’ici permis de garder un compromis social aujourd’hui largement menacé par les idéologies djihadistes comme nous l’avons vu au Nord du Mali et au Nigeria.

Mais encore une fois, au lieu de rester sur la thématique du débat, Monsieur Ramadan dévié en voulant régler des polémiques antérieures telles que ma critique sur sa position au Mali. Avant même le début du débat télévisé, il m’a interpellé en me disant : « c’est vous qui écrivez les articles contre moi ? » Pour dire qu’il était bien parti pour régler son compte à cet Africain qui a osé remettre en question sa parole sur l’islam !

C’était une anormalité qu’il ne pouvait digérer. Mais je ne garde rien contre lui ni n’entre jamais dans la logique d’attaques dont il est parfois injustement victime. Ce qui me choque aujourd’hui, c’est qu’il a profité de mes positions sur la politique des pays et organisations arabes en Afrique (paternalisme religieux) pour me présenter comme un anti-arabe, ses partisans même me prennent pour un pro-israélien alors que j’ai fermement condamné les massacres perpétrés contre les palestiniens dès le début du débat.

Je le sais avec un peu plus de recul et au vu des réactions d’incompréhension sur ma position : il était difficile de tenir un langage de raison à un moment où les esprits étaient surchauffés et les cœurs pleins d’émotion. Je ne regrette rien d’avoir appelé à la paix mais avec le camp de la paix et à critiquer les extrémistes de tous bords qui ne servent pas la paix qu’ils soient israéliens ou palestiniens.

J’ai l’esprit tranquille dans le sens où je n’ai jamais cautionné la politique de massacre et de tuerie qui est celle du gouvernement israélien mais aussi parce que j’ai le courage de dire à nos amis arabes que la solution se trouve dans le dialogue et que l’esprit va-t-en-guerre fait le jeu des ultra-radicaux du Likoud et du Hamas ! Toutefois je reconnais bien David de Goliath !

Pour rassurer les collègues et amis qui se sont beaucoup soucié de l’image diabolisant que Tariq Ramadan a voulu donner de moi (peut-être qu’on ne se connaît pas encore bien !), ma position que j’avais du mal à défendre à cause du temps médiatique qui ne laisse pas faire des démonstrations, se résume en trois points :

1- Condamnation ferme des exactions israéliennes (voir ma prise de position dès le début comme le premier intellectuel sénégalais qui s’est exprimé sur l’attitude inacceptable d’Israel en termes de violation du droit international et du droit international humanitaire : http://www.dakaractu.com/Entretien-Gaza-L-usage-disproportionne-de-la-force-par-Israel-en-flagrante-violation-du-droit-international-est-source_a70409.html

2- Je suis pour le dialogue et pour cela il faut favoriser le camp de la paix incarné par le Fatah et Mahmoud Abbas: si on laisse les extrémistes du Likoud et ceux du Hamas gérer la situation il n’y aura jamais de paix (au passage, c’est pourquoi, j’ai refusé qu’on compare Nelson Mandela au Hamas).

3- J’ai souligné la solidarité entre Africains et arabes mais je refuse toute forme de paternalisme et d’exportations d’idéologies niant la possibilité aux africains de vivre l’islam selon leurs réalités, comme je l’avais souligné en mars 2013 lors d’un autre débat avec Ramadan à Tunis http://en.qantara.de/content/interview-with-bakary-sambe-in-the-arab-world-we-africans-are-viewed-as-inferior-muslims

Tout est parti de ma critique sur les Frères musulmans quand j’ai expliqué que c’était certes un parti politique mais pas « ordinaire » ayant comme emblème deux sabres croisés et marqué en bas « Préparez-vous » http://www.dakaractu.com/Dr-Bakary-SAMBE-UGB-a-Tariq-Ramadan-Comparer-Nelson-Mandela-au-Hamas-est-une-insulte-a-sa-memoire_a72017.html

C’est par la suite que Tariq Ramadan m’a traité « d’esprit colonisé » en arguant que je tirais mon discours de Paris ou de Washington. Je n’ai pas compris cette attitude qui finalement ne m’a guère blessé surtout venant de quelqu’un qui, après avoir loyalement servi Tony Blair comme conseiller ns’est livré dans les bras de Shaykha Muza et du Qatar. soit !

Ma réponse à la fin du débat était que je m’inspirais surtout de Cheikh Ahmadou Bamba, Cheikh Ek Hadji Malick et de Cheikh Moussa Camara dans ma critique du djihadisme et de la violence au nom de l’islam, pour réaffirmer qu’en Afrique, nous avons des ressources pertinentes sur le discours religieux islamique et qu’on n’avait pas besoin d’être des musulmans sous tutelle.

Je crois même qu’au nom de la solidarité avec nos amis arabes, ils pourraient être invités à s’inspirer des réussites de l’expérience africaine de l’islam en termes d’harmonisation entre réalités sociales et principes religieux que j’appelle « assimilation critique de l’islam » et surtout de cohabitation pacifique tout en étant conscients de nos échecs respectifs.

Dr. Bakary Sambe Head of Observatory on Religious Radicalism and Conflicts in Africa

Center for the Study of Religions Gaston Berger University

www.cer-ugb.net

bakary.sambe@gmail.com

Hommage à Serigne Mansour Sy : Célébration de l’érudition et d’un classique original

28 mars 2014

 

Par Dr. Bakary Sambe

Tivaouane demeure cette cité de la foi où l’on célèbre la science. L’hommage rendu à Serigne Mansour Sy n’est point le fait d’une quelconque tradition de commémoration, mais un acte éloquent de revivification de la mission éducative, d’enseignement et d’élévation spirituelle que s’était fixée celui qui était finalement plus connu sous le nom de Borom Daaraji.

Ce fin lettré tant évoqué sous l’aspect qui colle le plus à sa personnalité à travers l’éducation, la transmission du savoir et du savoir-être à travers la Tarbiyya propre à la Tijâniyya, est l’une des marques de fabrique d’une école dans laquelle il fit ses armes et à laquelle il a, sa vie durant, rendu brillamment de ce qu’elle en reçut.

Dans cette école de Tivaouane où, très tôt, les apprenants étaient initiés aux finesses de la balâgha (rhétorique), ce que l’auteur du célèbre Laâmiyat al-Ajam appelait « açâlatou Ra’yi », l’originalité du propos et de l’idée, était certes la chose la mieux partagée. En témoignent les érudits et Muqaddam qu’elle a produits et qui en perpétuent la tradition.

D’ailleurs, comment pouvait-il en être autrement dans cette ambiance d’après Ndiarndé (Séminaire d’El Hadji Malick Sy) qui a vu l’éclosion des talents les plus divers dans cette école de Tivaouane où Serigne Mansour baignait dans l’ambiance du savoir recherché entre les chaires de Serigne Moussa NIang, de Serigne Chaybatou, Serigen Alioune Guèye parmi tant d’autres ?

L’exégète inimitable du Khilâç Zahab (L’or décanté) chef d’œuvre de Cheikh El Hadji Malick Sy, a été l’homme d’une érudition qui pouvait impressionner plus d’un si l’on sait qu’à l’image de nombreux muqaddams de Tivoauane, le Recteur indiscutable de l’Université de la « haut lieu de la droiture » – mahall istiqâma- comme dit Cheikh El Hadji Mansour,  n’est jamais sorti du Sénégal pour étudier dans une quelconque université du monde arabo-musulman.

Mais lorsque Serigne Mansour Sy plongeait son auditoire dans ces moments d’interconnexion des références classiques, naviguant entre le Qâmûs, les Wafayât d’Ibn Khallikan et les incontournables de l’historiographie médiévale tels que Murûj Zahab d’Al-Mas’ûdî du Kâmil fi-t-Târîkh d’Ibn al-Athîr, émergeait, le génie d’un classique non sans originalité dans son approche du patrimoine littéraire et historique.

C’est même à se demander si tous les auditeurs de cette Université ouverte ou « populaire » comme disait Marty du temps de Cheikh El Hadji Malick, avaient le privilège d’entrer avec toute la subtilité requise, dans cet univers hautement académique au sens d’une référentialité sans ambages : Serigne Mansour prenait le soin, en toute honnêteté intellectuelle, de citer ses sources, les confrontait, les hiérarchisait tout en laissant aux apprenants le choix des versions et des interprétations.

En réalité, il était très au fait des procédés de l’art de la Munâzara inauguré par érudits et philosophes de la Baytoul Hikma (Maison de la Sagesse) aux temps des Abbassides.

 Et même s’il n’était point aisé de se mettre dans les dispositions intellectuelles requises pour comprendre les énoncés d’un maître hors pair de la rhétorique et de la prosodie (arûd),  en enseignant averti des nécessités de son art, Serigne Mansour avait le sens de la pédagogie différenciée.

Quiconque, selon son niveau d’entendement et de conception, pouvait s’abreuver de ce puits de science débordant de générosité dans son savoir comme, d’ailleurs, son avoir.

Cette constance au service d’un sacerdoce selon lequel, l’école et la mission éducative de Maodo doivent demeurer des priorités distinctives de cette Hadra, et une profonde conviction que le flambeau de l’excellence spirituelle, adossée à la himma (volonté), nourrie de la science éternelle et de l’intelligence des contextes, doit toujours être porté au plus haut sont, pour notre génération, les socles sur lesqueles seront fondés, à jamais ,cette célébration du savoir incarné qu’était Serigne Mansour.

Dr. Bakary Sambe, Enseignant-Chercheur au Centre d’Etude des Religions, Université Gaston Berger, Saint-Louis.

 

Dr. Bakary Sambe de l’UGB : « Ce qui se passe en Centrafrique est inacceptable et dangereux pour la stabilité du continent »

20 mars 2014
Interrogé sur les derniers développements en Centrafrique à la suite du rapport d’Amnesty International sur les exactions commises contre les Musulmans dans ce pays, Dr. Bakary Sambe, coordonnateur de l’Observatoire des radicalismes et conflits religieux en Afrique (ORCRA) estime que « Ce qui se passe en Centrafrique est inacceptable et dangereux pour la stabilité du continent« .
Pour l’enseignant chercheur au Centre d’Etude des religions de l’UFR CRAC de l’Université Gaston Berger, « cette surenchère ehtnico-religieuse résultat d’une manipulation du religieux par les ex-rebelles de la Séléka sous l’égide de Michel Djotodja a fini par installer un climat de tension permanente entre deux communautés qui vivaient paisiblement dans ce pays d’environ 5 millions d’habitants« .
Revenant aux sources du conflits, Dr. Sambe a précisé que « ces massacres perpétrés par les anti-balakas sur la population musulmane sont le signe de l’entrée du conflit dans une seconde phase ; celle de l’enlisement et du risque de propagation si des mesures concrètes ne sont pas prises« .
Pour lui, » afin d’éviter que les choses arrivent à un point de non retour et pour que l’action de la communauté internationale demeure crédible, il faut plus de gages en termes d’égalité de traitement de toutes les communautés dans les opérations de maintien de la paix afin de ne pas cultiver un sentiment d’islamophobie cautionnée qui par serait vite exploité les extrémistes religieux qui n’espèrent que la régionalisation du conflit pour s’en emparer ».
Pour Dr. Sambe qui craint que l’enlisement de ce conflit soit instrumentalisé par des franges extrémistes de tous bords,, « il faudrait un déploiement plus massif de forces de sécurité dans ce pays et un appel au dialogue porté par les religieux comme au début du conflit« . Bakary Sambe insiste sur le fait  que « pour sécuriser la Centrafrique vaste de 623 000 km2, frontalier de pays en profonde crise sécuritaire et politique, il faut au moins 10 000 hommes si l’on prend en compte le nombre de miliciens retranchés dans des zones reculés du pays« .
Réitérant sa position lors du déclenchement des hostilités, Bakary Sambe rappelle : » Dès le début du conflit, j’avais appelé à l’instauration d’un dialogue sincère s’appuyant sur des autorités religieuses tolérantes et ouvertes comme l’imam de Bangui et certains membres du clergé afin de parer à la culture de la haine développée aujourd’hui par les extrémistes aussi bien protestants que musulmans« , conclut-il

Ignored and neglected: The Muslims of sub-Saharan Africa

20 mars 2014

Ignored and neglected: The Muslims of sub-Saharan Africa

Most attention for developments in the Muslim world, political, intellectual, or otherwise, focuses primarily on the Middle East and to some extent also South Asia. Geographically peripheral areas such as Southeast Asia, but even more so, sub-Saharan Africa, are generally neglected in both media and scholarship. The fact that Indonesia is the largest Muslim nation state in the world, and that Nigeria‘s Muslims number close to 90 million (more than the entire populations of, say, Iran, Turkey, or Egypt) is often ignored.

When areas such as West Africa do  receive coverage it is generally due to political crises or acute security concerns emerging from the region which are thought to have an effect on developments elsewhere. Seldom is there any attention for the local situation in its own right or a genuine interest in the region’s place within the Muslim world or in its historical contributions to Islamic civilization. Africans are seen as ‘marginal’ Muslims.

Ignored and neglected: The Muslims of sub-Saharan Africa dans ABOUT US MosqueDjenneWeb-786889

In view of  recent events in Mali there has at least been some awareness of the destruction of its indigenous Islamic legacy in the course of clashes between locals, outside Islamic activists, and intervening foreign armed forces. However, so far this had hardly gone beyond indignation over the threats to UNESCO heritage sites such as the town of Djenné and it Great Mosque. Some cursory mention was also made of the equally endangered manuscript collections of Timbuktu. Such concerns demonstrate that there is an inkling of the role of Africa in shaping Muslim culture.

But that is all about the past, present-day Muslims in countries like Mali and its neighbours still face marginalization. However, some critical voices among its intellectuals do speak about the discrimination they face from their co-religionists, often in the guise of bringing ‘true Islam’ to Africa.

Bakary+Sambe dans INTERNATIONAL
Bakary Sambe

This issue was addressed by the Senegalese intellectual Bakary Sambe. Trained in Lyon as an Arabist, Africanist and political scientist, he specializes in trans-regional Muslim relations, in particular between the Arab world and Africa. He has taught in France and Senegal, and has held research associations with the European Foundation for Democracy and the Aga Khan University in London.

Organisations that are financed by Arab nations such as Kuwait, Qatar and Saudi Arabia are attempting what could be described as an « Islamisation » of our region; they want to bring their idea of « true Islam » to sub-Saharan Africa. This is pure ideology motivated by an Arab paternalism that I vehemently oppose. The attempt to « Arabise » us is based on a total denial of our culture as African Muslims.

His criticism is not only directed at the oil-rich Gulf States, but also individuals such as Tariq Ramadan, who  — although controversial in his own right — is nevertheless regarded as an ‘acceptable face of Islam’. But according to Sambe, his attitudes still reflect a kind of paternalism towards non-Arab Muslims which he considers ‘imperialist‘.

At the same time, he sees little emancipatory or redeeming value in promoting Islam Noir or ‘Black Islam’:

This term was introduced during the colonial era and sought to infantilise us, the African people. Allegedly, we were so emotional because we were not as spiritually mature as the Arabs, who were consequently viewed as more dangerous. France has always tried to establish a barrier between the Maghreb and the sub-Saharan region, to prevent any intellectual exchange from taking place.

timbuktu_manuscripts dans ISLAM AFRICAIN
Islamic manuscripts in Timbuktu

He finds its ironic that now, at the beginning of the 21th century, Gulf Arabs come to ‘Islamize’ West-Africa’s Muslims, while in the 15th century, when large parts of the Arabian Peninsula had reverted to being a cultural backwater, the scholars in Timbuktu were producing their treasured manuscripts….

Sambe thinks it is high time for African Muslims to shake off their inferiority complex and work redeveloping their own religious and intellectual traditions. Only this way Muslims can interact on par which each other.

L’homme africain entrera-t-il un jour dans la fin de l’Histoire ?

20 mars 2014

L’homme africain entrera-t-il un jour dans la fin de l’Histoire ?

Dans un discours à Dakar qui avait fait scandale, Nicolas Sarkozy avait évoqué la difficulté de l’Homme africain à rentrer dans l’Histoire. Au regard des conflits sans fin qui déchirent l’Afrique, la question qui se pose à elle est plutôt celle de sa capacité à sortir, comme l’Europe avant elle, d’une histoire faite de guerres et de violences.

Guerres sans fin

La France a lancé une intervention en Centrafrique.La France a lancé une intervention en Centrafrique. Crédit Reuters

Atlantico : Alors que François Hollande a reçu les chefs d’État africains à l’Élysée pour le sommet pour la paix et la sécurité en Afrique ce week-end, la France a lancé une intervention en Centrafrique.Quelles sont les zones actuelles de conflits en Afrique ?

Bakary Sambe : Le continent est devenu un terrain de jeux d’influences : intérêts et puissances s’y affrontent pendant que les États qui se délitent font face au défi du déficit d’État. L’Afrique vit pleinement le choc entre le principe de souveraineté et la trans-nationalité des acteurs. A l’Est, sur la corne de l’Afrique la Somalie fait face aux attaques des Shebabs. Alors que la République démocratique du Congo se déchire encore, la Centrafrique est entré dans un cycle de violence dont la fin n’est pas du tout proche, le nord du Nigeria vit au rythme des attentats terroristes et des attaques de Boko Haram qui étend ses opérations jusqu’au nord-Cameroun de temps à autre. Pendant ce temps, au Mali, après plusieurs mois d’occupation au Nord, les élections se sont bien passées mais les problèmes persistent avec le MNLA qui déclare la reprise de la guerre contre le pouvoir de Bamako. Et de temps en temps, les incursions djihadistes et les attaques spectaculaires rappellent que, malgré l’efficacité temporaire de l’Opération Serval, on ne vainc jamais le terrorisme par des blindés. D’ailleurs, l’opération française en Centrafrique sera beaucoup plus compliquée que Serval. Ce sera une guerre urbaine, sans front ni ennemi identifié sur fond de surenchère ethnico-confessionnelle, véritable bourbier pour les armées conventionnelles dont les stratégies de combat sont rendues obsolètes à l’ère de la guerre asymétrique imposée par les guérillas et les groupes terroristes.

De quelle nature sont ces différents conflits ? Quelles en sont les causes ?

La chute du mur de Berlin a consacré l’obsolescence de la guerre dans le sens d’un affrontement entre armées conventionnelles. Les types de conflits que l’on rencontre en Afrique sont de différents types : les irrédentismes et guérillas engagés dans des luttes politico-nationalistes comme le MNLA au nord du Mali, le Darfour jusqu’à la création du Soudan du Sud etc. Un autre type de conflit est celui qui part généralement d’une contestation politico-armée du pouvoir central pouvant aboutir à son renversement comme le CNT libyen ou la Séléka centrafricaine ou à un pourrissement comme en République démocratique du Congo. Les effets de la chute de Khadhafi combinés avec le redéploiement d’Al-Qaïda au Maghreb islamique et le foisonnement des groupuscules djihadistes plongent la zone sahélienne dans l’absurde guerre contre le terrorisme.

Les opérations terroristes se nourrissent de la faiblesse des États et de la trans-nationalité d’un ennemi devenu diffus depuis qu’Al-Qaïda a abandonné l’option des causes globales en se contentant de parasiter les conflits locaux auxquels ils s’efforcent de donner un habillage religieux. Ce fut exactement la stratégie d’Ansar Dine au Nord-Mali avec la question touarègue. La confessionnalisation du conflit en Centrafrique risque d’aboutir aux mêmes travers alors qu’on est dans un pays qui est une véritable mosaïque ethno-religieuse pour une population de 5 millions d’habitants dont 35% de catholiques, 45% de protestants, 15% de musulmans sans compter la minorité animiste de 5 %. Le choc entre les extrémismes musulmans wahhabites et évangélistes chrétiens peut aggraver le déchirement d’une société centrafricaine fortement secouée par des crises politiques répétitives depuis plus d’une décennie.

Comment de temps encore ces conflits « pour rien » dureront-ils ? A quelles conditions le continent africain pourra-t-il entrer dans la « fin de l’Histoire » ?

Malheureusement pour le continent, la boîte de Pandore avait été ouverte depuis la partition du Soudan et le déclenchement de la guerre de Libye qui portait bien son nom d’Aube de l’Odyssée. Je crains fort que l’Afrique soit entrée dans une phase d’au moins vingt ans où ce genre de conflits va freiner son développement tant attendu et qui se profilait à l’horizon avec la saturation prévisible de l’Asie, pendant que l’Europe est encore plongée dans la crise alors que les rares niches de croissances sont sur le continent noir. Beaucoup s’accordent sur un fait : l’Afrique est en train de revivre les pires moments similaires à ceux du temps de la Guerre froide où par alliés et agents interposés, différentes puissances et idéologies (salafisme wahhabites, évangélistes pentecôtistes, baptistes) s’y affrontent par délégation. Nous voilà, après la période des conférences nationales et des processus démocratiques dans le sillage de la Conférence de la Baule des années 1990, plongés, de nouveau, pour longtemps dans l’ère des sommets pour la paix et la sécurité. Espérons cette fois-ci que de ce mal peut-être nécessaire sortira définitivement du bien pour ce continent plein de potentialités, pour paraphraser un peu, Léopold Sédar Senghor.

Read more at http://www.atlantico.fr/decryptage/homme-africain-entrera-t-jour-dans-fin-histoire-bakary-sambe-920574.html#jvWD50bhjOhzgVyX.99

Bakary Sambe de l’UGB sur France24  » le Maroc bénéficie, en Afrique, d’un capital-image adossé à un bilatéralisme sélectif efficace »

20 mars 2014

Bakary Sambe de l’UGB sur France24  » le Maroc bénéficie, en Afrique, d’un capital-image adossé à un bilatéralisme sélectif efficace »


Bakary Sambe de l'UGB sur France24 " le Maroc bénéficie, en Afrique, d'un capital-image adossé à un bilatéralisme sélectif efficace"
Dans une interview donnée au site de la chaîne France 24, Dr. Bakary Sambe de l’Université Gaston Berger de Saint-Louis (CER-CRAC) revient sur la stratégie marocaine en Afrique subsaharienne dans une analyse de la dernière tournée du Roi Mohammed VI dans la région.
« En cette époque de ruée économique vers l’Afrique et alors que l’Europe et les États-Unis sont en crise, le Maroc se positionne avec ses banques et ses accords de libre-échange qui vont lui permettre de commercer librement avec des pays constituant un marché de 250 millions d’habitants », affirme Bakary Sambe, enseignant-chercheur à l’université Gaston-Berger de Saint-Louis au Sénégal, et auteur d’ »Islam et diplomatie : la politique africaine du Maroc ».

Et d’ajouter : « Aujourd’hui des entreprises marocaines battent des entreprises françaises sur des appels d’offres parce qu’elles bénéficient de ce lobbying. » (…)

Son malikisme, l’une de quatre doctrines du sunnisme, est particulièrement prisée par les gouvernements luttant contre le fondamentalisme islamique. « Face à l’avancée du wahhabisme et du salafisme d’une part, et du chiisme iranien d’autre part, le roi essaye de créer un sorte de sainte alliance autour de l’islam malikite modéré dont le Maroc serait le centre », analyse Bakary Sambe.

« Depuis l’indépendance, le Maroc a développé un sentiment d’encerclement : au Nord, par les Espagnols avec qui les relations sont difficiles sur les enclaves de Ceuta et Melilla, et à l’Est, par l’Algérie qui soutient le Front Polisario [mouvement indépendantiste sahraoui], rappelle Bakary Sambe. Aussi voit-il sa politique extérieure comme un désenclavement stratégique vers le Sud, au moment d’une recomposition diplomatique dans la région. »

Mais, pour Bakary Sambe, Mohammed VI a encore une chose à faire avant d’asseoir définitivement sa popularité auprès des Subsahariens : gommer cette image de « gendarme de la politique anti-immigration de l’Europe » qui colle à son pays. Et ce, malgré les réformes adoptées en septembre 2013 par le royaume afin d’offrir davantage de droits aux migrants clandestins.

Source : http://www.france24.com/fr/20140306-maroc-mohammed-vi-m6-tournee-afrique-subsaharienne-gabon-leader/

Senegalese academic says prevention is vital as West African countries battle the rise of radical Islam

12 décembre 2013

Our series examining the Origins of Africa’s War of Terror continues with Senegaleseacademic Dr Bakary Sambe who says that a deep reform of education systems in the Sahelian countries is key to preventing the rapid rise of Islamic militancy in the region.

Islam in West Africa has historically had a unifying effect within the sub-region inspired by the Sufi brotherhood which represents a peaceful way of practising Islam. Yet, as radical Islam grows, the African continent and the Sahel region in particular are now being labelled as the new Afghanistan in the political discourse.

While the majority of analysts point to poverty, youth employment and local political crises as major factors in violent extremism, there are other reasons that explain the rapid growth of this phenomenon at national and regional level. These include under-resourced state institutions mostly in the educational and social sectors, the absence of rule of law and impunity which contribute to the erosion of citizen confidence in the state and democratic institutions.

In the meantime, the current dual nature of the education system in the majority of Sahelian countries (Western and Arabic) could in the next few decades, if not already, cause a deep social divide, one that could be exploited by Islamic movements.

In Senegal, Mali, Niger and Chad, there is an urgent need to reassert the state’s control over sensitive issues such as knowledge transmission and socialisation. The Boko Haram phenomenon should make West African states more alert to the dangerous juxtaposition of differing education systems when what is really at stake is building an inclusive society.

Even the United Nations has called for a “comprehensive approach” to extremism given the failure of military solutions in recent conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq.

In light of these considerations, it would be relevant to have an overview of the political and religiousdimension of the extremism which will give a better understanding of the problem. Over the last few months, the focus has been on religious extremism while ethno-national and political aspects have been ignored. In analysing the recent Mali crisis, one has to take into account not just the religious perspective, but also the ethnic issue which is the Tuareg struggle for self-determination. The overlapping nature of the religious and ethno-national dimensions of this conflict make it susceptible to abuse by groups such as Al Qaeda in the Magreb (AQIM) and Movement for the Oneness and Jihad in West Africa (MUJAO). Al-Qaeda is now more interested in parasitising local conflicts than promoting global causes. Religious extremism feeds more easily into terrorism and organised crime and poses a threat to public peace and to sovereign integrity of countries. The case of Mali remains relevant. However, violent ethno-political and religious extremism are not new phenomena in the region given recent crises in Guinea, Côte d’Ivoire, Nigeria (the Biafran War and more recently with Boko Haram) and Mali.

The French intervention in Mali triggered a virulent debate between scholars and activists. While jihadism was for the most part universally rejected, opinions about France’s political motives were dividedOf course, terrorism cannot be solved by military means alone. However Mali was not the only country under threat from armed jihadists, in fact, the security of West Africa was at risk. This is why I was among the group of African intellectuals who supported the intervention.

There is still a great deal of debate about France’s role during the Mali crisis. I certainly do not support any neo-colonial interests that France might possibly associate with its course of action. Politically speaking, my generation grew up with a critical view of European colonialism and imperialism. Now there exists Arab imperialism and my position is that we have to fight that too. For some time now, the proponents of international Wahhabism have been working on a plan to establish a Wahhabi zone of influence that extends right across the entire Sahel region from Eritrea, Somalia, Chad, Northern Nigeria, Niger and Mali through to Senegal. This represents a huge threat to our brand of Islam which has always lived in harmony with the local culture of a country. ​​

Organisations financed by Arab nations such as Kuwait, Qatar and Saudi Arabia are attempting what could be described as the “Islamisation” of the Sahel region. Their goal is to bring their idea of “true Islam” to sub-Saharan Africa. This ideology is motivated by a kind of Arab paternalism that most West Africans vehemently oppose. The attempt to “Arabise” these Muslim communities is based on a total denial of the local cultures of African Muslims. The destruction of the mausoleums in Timbuktu was an extreme example of this. Poverty is certainly a factor. The African state is weak and does not operate any kind of social policy. But above all, the state has withdrawn too much from the education system, leaving the field to non-state organisations which are financed out of Kuwait, Qatar and Saudi Arabia.

This is especially true of Mali, where the state education system is impoverished and religious players have been given too much room to manoeuvre. This gives rise to a parallel education system with an ideology that comes from abroad and over which the state has absolutely no control. To a German journalist interviewing me after a rancorous debate with the Swiss academic, Tariq Ramadan, I said, “In the Arab world, Muslims from sub-Saharan Africa are viewed as second-class Muslims, as sub-Muslims. In the fifteenth century, Timbuktu was an important city of scholars, and now, in the twenty-first century, Arab organisations exploit our young people and tell them that it is their job to Islamise their societies! My response is this: Africa must stop importing ideologies from abroad and regarding itself as an inferior Zone B”.

The nature of the threat posed by transnational groups, together with the new concept of territorial spaces, demands multidisciplinary expertise that is not only related to security. This expertise will have to take into account not only the geopolitical aspects but also the ideological and sociological dimensions of a multifaceted phenomenon that often accompanies indicators such as rampant poverty, youth unemployment and blatant inequalities. The multidimensional character of the threat, and, therefore, of the response, apparently has not yet been fully appreciated, especially by the relevant Senegalese security services.

The problem is so complex and multifaceted that experts and African scholars recommend establishing a multidisciplinary platform for the strategic monitoring of religious radicalism, providing regular updates on developments and preparing a forward-looking plan in close collaboration with the relevant authorities and development partners.

Dr Bakary Sambe is an Assistant Professor at Gaston Berger University in Senegal. He is also Coordinator of the Observatory of Religious Radicalism and Conflicts in Africa at the Centre for Religious Studies.

Source LSE Blog : http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/africaatlse/2013/11/13/senegalese-academic-says-prevention-is-vital-as-west-african-countries-battle-the-rise-of-radical-islam/

Situation en Centrafrique :Dr. Bakary Sambe de l’UGB craint le « choc des extrémismes et la régionalisation du conflit »

12 décembre 2013
26 novembre 2013
La situationqui prévaut en Centrafrique caractérisé de « pré-génocidaire » par les chancelleries diplomatiques inquiètent au plus haut niveau au point que l’ONU appelle à agir vite. 
Selon Dr. Bakary Sambe de l’Université Gaston Berger (UFR CRAC), ce pays a toujours représenté un sorte de « mosaïque confessionnelle » avec « une population de 5 millions d’habitants dont 35 % de catholiques, 15% de musulmans, 45 % de protestants et 5 % d’animistes » précise t-il.
D’après Dr Sambe qui coordonne l’Observatoire des radicalismes et conflits religieux en Afrique (ORCRA) au Centre d’étude des Religions , « malgré cette diversité, n’a jamais été, auparavant source de tension majeure dans ce pays jusqu’à l’arrivée de Michel Am-Nondokro Djotodia au pouvoir« .
Revenant aux sources de cette crise, Dr. Sambe rappelle que, « c’est à ce moment que certains hommes politiques ont commencé à parler d’islamisation du pays alors que lui-même s’en défend toujours affirmant être au service de tous les Centrafricains« .
Interrogé sur la position des learers religieux dans ce conflit où se mêle religion et politique et qui risque de créer, selon lui « un second Rwanda« , Bakary Sambe explique que « même l’imam Kobline Layama, une des personnalités musulmanes influentes a toujours appelé à la retenue« .
Mais, selon le chercheur spécialiste des réseaux transnationaux et des radicalismes religieux, « la crainte se situe surtout au niveau des positions extrêmes que peuvent prendre certaines franges wahhabites et salafistes sous influence étrangère mais aussi des personnalités charismatiques comme le Pasteur intégriste évangéliste, Guere Koyan,  qui théorise déjà une islamisation de la Centrafrique« .
En quelque sorte, conclut Dr. Bakary Sambe, « il faudra tout faire pour éviter un choc des extrémismes surtout au regard de la situation dans le Sahel pour un pays frontalier à la fois des deux Soudan et du Nord Cameroun où les éléments de Boko Haram sont déjà actifs mais aussi de la République démocratique du Congo en pleine ébullition« 

Guerres sans fin : L’homme africain entrera-t-il un jour dans la fin de l’Histoire ?

12 décembre 2013

Dans un discours à Dakar qui avait fait scandale, Nicolas Sarkozy avait évoqué la difficulté de l’Homme africain à rentrer dans l’Histoire. Au regard des conflits sans fin qui déchirent l’Afrique, la question qui se pose à elle est plutôt celle de sa capacité à sortir, comme l’Europe avant elle, d’une histoire faite de guerres et de violences.

Atlantico : Alors que François Hollande a reçu les chefs d’État africains à l’Élysée pour le sommet pour la paix et la sécurité en Afrique ce week-end, la France a lancé une intervention en Centrafrique.Quelles sont les zones actuelles de conflits en Afrique ?

Bakary Sambe : Le continent est devenu un terrain de jeux d’influences : intérêts et puissances s’y affrontent pendant que les États qui se délitent font face au défi du déficit d’État. L’Afrique vit pleinement le choc entre le principe de souveraineté et la trans-nationalité des acteurs. A l’Est, sur la corne de l’Afrique la Somalie fait face aux attaques des Shebabs. Alors que la République démocratique du Congo se déchire encore, la Centrafrique est entré dans un cycle de violence dont la fin n’est pas du tout proche, le nord du Nigeria vit au rythme des attentats terroristes et des attaques de Boko Haram qui étend ses opérations jusqu’au nord-Cameroun de temps à autre. Pendant ce temps, au Mali, après plusieurs mois d’occupation au Nord, les élections se sont bien passées mais les problèmes persistent avec le MNLA qui déclare la reprise de la guerre contre le pouvoir de Bamako. Et de temps en temps, les incursions djihadistes et les attaques spectaculaires rappellent que, malgré l’efficacité temporaire de l’Opération Serval, on ne vainc jamais le terrorisme par des blindés. D’ailleurs, l’opération française en Centrafrique sera beaucoup plus compliquée que Serval. Ce sera une guerre urbaine, sans front ni ennemi identifié sur fond de surenchère ethnico-confessionnelle, véritable bourbier pour les armées conventionnelles dont les stratégies de combat sont rendues obsolètes à l’ère de la guerre asymétrique imposée par les guérillas et les groupes terroristes.

De quelle nature sont ces différents conflits ? Quelles en sont les causes ?

La chute du mur de Berlin a consacré l’obsolescence de la guerre dans le sens d’un affrontement entre armées conventionnelles. Les types de conflits que l’on rencontre en Afrique sont de différents types : les irrédentismes et guérillas engagés dans des luttes politico-nationalistes comme le MNLA au nord du Mali, le Darfour jusqu’à la création du Soudan du Sud etc. Un autre type de conflit est celui qui part généralement d’une contestation politico-armée du pouvoir central pouvant aboutir à son renversement comme le CNT libyen ou la Séléka centrafricaine ou à un pourrissement comme en République démocratique du Congo. Les effets de la chute de Khadhafi combinés avec le redéploiement d’Al-Qaïda au Maghreb islamique et le foisonnement des groupuscules djihadistes plongent la zone sahélienne dans l’absurde guerre contre le terrorisme.

Les opérations terroristes se nourrissent de la faiblesse des États et de la trans-nationalité d’un ennemi devenu diffus depuis qu’Al-Qaïda a abandonné l’option des causes globales en se contentant de parasiter les conflits locaux auxquels ils s’efforcent de donner un habillage religieux. Ce fut exactement la stratégie d’Ansar Dine au Nord-Mali avec la question touarègue. La confessionnalisation du conflit en Centrafrique risque d’aboutir aux mêmes travers alors qu’on est dans un pays qui est une véritable mosaïque ethno-religieuse pour une population de 5 millions d’habitants dont 35% de catholiques, 45% de protestants, 15% de musulmans sans compter la minorité animiste de 5 %. Le choc entre les extrémismes musulmans wahhabites et évangélistes chrétiens peut aggraver le déchirement d’une société centrafricaine fortement secouée par des crises politiques répétitives depuis plus d’une décennie.

Comment de temps encore ces conflits « pour rien » dureront-ils ? A quelles conditions le continent africain pourra-t-il entrer dans la « fin de l’Histoire » ?

Malheureusement pour le continent, la boîte de Pandore avait été ouverte depuis la partition du Soudan et le déclenchement de la guerre de Libye qui portait bien son nom d’Aube de l’Odyssée. Je crains fort que l’Afrique soit entrée dans une phase d’au moins vingt ans où ce genre de conflits va freiner son développement tant attendu et qui se profilait à l’horizon avec la saturation prévisible de l’Asie, pendant que l’Europe est encore plongée dans la crise alors que les rares niches de croissances sont sur le continent noir. Beaucoup s’accordent sur un fait : l’Afrique est en train de revivre les pires moments similaires à ceux du temps de la Guerre froide où par alliés et agents interposés, différentes puissances et idéologies (salafisme wahhabites, évangélistes pentecôtistes, baptistes) s’y affrontent par délégation. Nous voilà, après la période des conférences nationales et des processus démocratiques dans le sillage de la Conférence de la Baule des années 1990, plongés, de nouveau, pour longtemps dans l’ère des sommets pour la paix et la sécurité. Espérons cette fois-ci que de ce mal peut-être nécessaire sortira définitivement du bien pour ce continent plein de potentialités, pour paraphraser un peu, Léopold Sédar Senghor.

La France a lancé une intervention en Centrafrique.
Read more at http://www.atlantico.fr/decryptage/homme-africain-entrera-t-jour-dans-fin-histoire-bakary-sambe-920574.html#0X2xL6wxqQiE2sJx.99

 
Read more at http://www.atlantico.fr/decryptage/homme-africain-entrera-t-jour-dans-fin-histoire-bakary-sambe-920574.html#0X2xL6wxqQiE2sJx.99

 

 
Read more at http://www.atlantico.fr/decryptage/homme-africain-entrera-t-jour-dans-fin-histoire-bakary-sambe-920574.html#0X2xL6wxqQiE2sJx.99

123456...19